Tag Archives: cooking

Fire-snow-cooking

Fire, Snow and cooking
Re-Blogging and Linking to two separate articles here. Rogers Blog where he explains how to setup a campfire and a new to Youtuber, a prepper and self reliant buddy of mine who has a done a series of videos to show people how to make a winter shelter and how to build a winter fire. 

This is a skill that anyone who lives in any climate where there is cold and winter should know of. This post will have some of my own info included, some re-blogged info from Roger’s blog along with a re-blogged video series from a ex Canadian Military buddy of mine who lives way out in the flatlands of Canada!
Pict0007b

This winter campfire photo was taken in January a couple of years ago. The next photo shows the same fire pit in the summer time.

A great way to build a fire in winter if you have a camping spot for year round use or look for established camping spots along any trail or campground. Remember you do not have to always re-invent the wheel, just keep it simpler and it works.
firepit lrgb

Same firepit in summer time as the winter shot above.

A blog post by RMACTSC where he explains how to setup a campfire
…. excerpt.. 
KINDLING is the foundation of any fire. It is made of lightweight materials that are capable of burning quickly and igniting heavier materials. Kindling can be made from a mixture of twigs, tiny sticks, slivers of shaved wood, dried leaves, paper, cardboard, cotton balls, dryer lint, birch bark, dried grass, dried pine needles, etc. You’ll be using small sticks to then form a tepee and get your fire started. …. read more….

http://rmactsc.wordpress.com/2014/01/03/campfire-cooking/

The following link is to the topic of winter fire on the CanAmPreppers.net forum
excerpt
… If you are in the bush and had nowhere to make a fire but on the snow, and no rocks were available because they’re all under the snow and ice, what would you do? … read more
http://canampreppers.net/forum/index.php?topic=1091.0

The new YouTubers in action, building a winter fire and winter shelter heated by fire

Canadian Candle Fire on snow


http://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5j4M5deU5cC-xt_HYiZgSA/videos
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-ZZFtEktXE


The next is a series of photos created while I was at Buroak Wilderness Adventures this summer. The owner of the camp a buddy of mine created a stunning all season fireplace/pit. Just look at all the features this cooking camp fire pit has;

  • flat rock for use as a warming centre and for putting objects on like the kettle
  • lots and I mean lots of hanging hooks all created from hardwood branches
  • excellent over the camp stand
  • excellent front and back projection areas
  • not seen in the photo is a canvas cook’s tent which is close enough to the fire to catch heat from this in the fall/winter/spring making your old bones just a bit more comfortable!

Buroak Wilderness 012bb

Excellent campfire setup.

Buroak Wilderness 031bb

This shot shows the ease at which cooking at various heights is accomplished.
Buroak Wilderness 039bb

Dinner is almost ready, can you not just smell the yummy goodness! Fresh field potatoes, fresh picked corn (non gmo), fresh farm raised free range chicken.

Kinda making me hungry all over again! Plus the smell of freshly brewed coffee all cooked on hard and softwoods.

Remember the old ways, remember this is how Humans have lived for thousands upon thousands of years.

This is one of the reasons your computer screen saver is of the outdoors and not your bosses cubical or office! just saying !

Hopefully these skills will be appeal to you, so get out and learn or get out and practice but above all just get out and have some fun folks!
Until next time Cheers ~wild_E

Come on out to the forums at CanAmPreppers.net where we talk about this stuff and so much more for prepping, self-reliance, homesteading and survival skills.

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Filed under Blog post, CDN Military, Equipment, Family_Friends, Food, images photography, Improvised Stoves Heaters, Kits, Recipe, Rocket Stove, Shelter, Survival Prepping

Alcohol Stoves Improved L-Can Stove

(similar to Cat Can Stove)

OK Lcan or L-can stands for Liver Can Stove, yuk you say, no cat, and well I like liver and it comes in convenient backpacking sizes to boot!

So, take it plus another re-purposed Canned Salmon and you have a complete cooking system.
Make it using a Drill or a rock and a nail, although the drill is by far easier, so do it in advance.

The following are self-explanatory pictures, hopefully they will help you out.
Now, in the next couple of days, I will post my little lightweight, ultra light weight, re-cycled and re-purposed combo cook set! You just won’t believe your eyes, so I will also create a YouTube video of them in action.

on with the show;

showing how to make the Liver Can Stove (similar to Cat Can Stove)

showing how to make the Liver Can Stove (similar to Cat Can Stove)

showing Liver Can Stove along with penny stove, sitting on recycled can pot holder (similar to Cat Can Stove)

showing Liver Can Stove along with penny stove, sitting on recycled can pot holder (similar to Cat Can Stove)

NOTE: the can on the top left is slightly larger than the can on the right. This is what you want, the slightly larger can on the left allows just a tiny bit more air flow and the fuel burning process is speeded up as well as hotter with the extra height. I believe the can on the left is a Salmon Can and the one on the right is a Tuna Can!
Inside is a Penny Stove, look to internet for hundreds of designs for them. My adaptation is the underside. The normal can is bent upwards for strength when it is used as a pop can, you do not need it for a wee tiny stove. My making the bottom go the other way, you are now able to get more fuel in the penny stove, for longer burn times.

showing Liver Can Stove along with two other earlier versions, sitting on recycled can pot holder (similar to Cat Can Stove)

showing Liver Can Stove along with two other earlier versions, sitting on recycled can pot holder (similar to Cat Can Stove)

Acohol Stoves 062bOk, so the last one is the hardest for some to figure out!
Here it goes, the pot holder on the left is an Esbit stove stand. Take out the alcohol fuel tabs that come with it, put them in a ziplock bag, toss into your fuel starter/fire starter bag, which is part of your Go or Bug Out Bag system.

On the right is one of my Liver Can Stoves inside a Salmon Can Stove holder/pot stand. The Tin Foil, which I carry for a number of reasons and can be re-used if you get some good heavy weight stuff, not the dollar store stuff as it is tissue paper thin.

FUEL

I use 99.9% pure Methyl Hydrate found at Home Depot, Rona, Canadian Tire or Home Hardware. It comes in a 1 gallon container for about $10-$12 dollars. Pour the fuel into a smaller 1 pint or 8 oz fuel bottle and you have a lightweight and more ergonomic fuelling system.

Fondue fuel does not burn hot enough,
Alcohol normally comes in only 75% strength (Methyl is pure Alcohol as well, or for the US peeps, Denatured Alcohol)

These stoves are quick, odourless, efficient as well as being able to be used under a pile of wet wood to get it going. So light up my life and light up my fire 🙂

Hope this helps you out

+ + Legal warning, do not do this, consult a specialist, not responsible, this is what I did, if you burn down or die, not my problems!

* * * CAUTION HOT !
use leather gloves or hotdog tongs to remove the can from the top
 
Note: this should be vented outside as it creates more smoky residue in the air as well as you should have a supply of fresh air for it as well, or you might not wake up!
 
Oxygen Thief – carbon monoxide warning – use a detector – fresh air – venting system as well
your warned, use at your own risk!! yadda yadda yadda legal speak, use your common sense  be safe

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Filed under Blog post, Equipment, Food, Improvised Stoves Heaters, Survival Prepping

Dehydrator Meat

Saw this post and had to respond to it.

Jerky:

Sorry but I thought this should be separate from the dehydrator thread.
I have just been reading up on making jerky and until today I always thought the meat was pre-cooked. Wouldn’t there be a health risk with drying and eating “raw” meat jerky?

My local store has some cheap beef heart that I was going to try drying.

wish I still had my old Ronco Dehydrator

miss this Dehydrator

Dehydrator jerky is the same as dried jerky.
The drying process was originally done in two ways;
Sun Drying
Smoke drying

Both are a curing, cooking and preservation processes, both remove the moisture and cure the meat. There are variations to the two main ways that were done, you can actually do some very intriguing combinations as well. Both of the main drying processes remove the moisture, moisture and oxygen are the main causes of meat becoming bad.

Bugs and Mold love moisture thus the curing process removes the moisture, cures the meat for long-term storage. Variations on the theme, smoking and creating Bill-tongue (South African delicacy.. give them some and watch them gobble it down). Now as stated there are many ways to preserve the meat, some also include potting in which you fill a jar or container with meat, cooked or uncooked slather the top with 4-10 inches of certain types of fat to keep out the oxygen. Google meat potting.

The Mennonites have a process similar to the bill-tongue meat process, the meat looks like great big salami meat rolls. Salami making is another variation on the drying and processing theme for meat preservation. The Mennonite way of curing the meat is a combination, drying, smoking and cooking process in which the rolls are able to be stored in their final wrap just hanging from the rafters for up to 3-4 years.

Dehydrating jerky is as simple as doing it over the fire, in the Oven or in the actual dehydrator. This has evolved from the labour intensive outdoor sun drying and outdoor food drying although very eco-friendly is labour intensive as you need a 24hr guard to swat away the bugs and keep away the animals.

Buy the way I have had some pre cooked Beef Jerky and would not recommend you go that route so much, it does not taste as good pre cooked. There is also a size variation, in that pre cooked pieces are always much larger than the thinly shaved meat that is pre cut before dehydrating. Dehydrating cooked meat is good however for preserving the meat to be re-constituted later for soups and stews.

One of my fav all time food experiences was paper thing Bison strips, smoked and then put on some thin whole grain fresh bread. Can you say Yummy! So tender, so mouth-watering and surprisingly so filling. When you use the best ingredients you become fuller from the full and rich taste as well as from the quality of the food source.

might add more in later, that is a synopsis.

 

Tags;
tongue, bill-tongue, dehydrator, smoking, curing, meat, cooking, method, sun drying, smoking, Mennonite, way, south african, old way, preservation 

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Filed under Blog post, Food, Survival Prepping